Saturday, XVII Week of Ordinary Time, Year A

O you of little faith, why did you doubt?

Readings: 1st: Jer 28:1-17; Ps 118; Gos: Mt 14:22-36

This brief reflection was written by Fr. Njoku Canice Chukwuemeka, C.S.Sp. He is a Catholic Priest and a member of the Congregation of the Holy Spirit (Spiritans). He is a missionary in Puerto Rico, the island of enchantment. He is the Chancellor of the Dioceses of Fajardo-Humacao, Puerto Rico; the Parish Priest of Parroquia la Resurrección del Senor, Canovanas and the Major Superior of the Congregation of the Holy Spirit (Spiritans), Circumscription of Puerto Rico and Dominican Republic. For more details and comments contact him at:  canice_c_njoku@yahoo.com, canicechukwuemeka@gmail.com.

Today, the Monday of the eighteenth week of ordinary time, Matthew presents us a dramatic faith encounter between Christ and his disciples.

At times in life, one can be so frustrated by difficulties to the point that one becomes too afraid to advance in life. Such a state could derange one’s mental process and perception of life.

Such was the case of the poor disciples of Christ in today’s gospel represented by Peter. While still battling with a deadly storm threatening their lives, Christ came to their rescue walking on the sea.

Already paralyzed by fear of the storm, Peter took Christ for a ghost. Obviously, salt was added to their injury. Of course, his fear was justifiable. It is not normal for a human being to walk on the sea without sinking.

The rest of this episode is very interesting. Christ assured Peter: “Take courage, it is I; do not be afraid.” Peter made an urgent request: “Lord, if it is you, command me to come to you on the water.”

Christ invited him: “Come!” Peter stepped into the water, took a few steps, and began to sink. This was in spite of the assurance Christ gave him. Of course, Christ came to his rescue.

Some times in life, we start well like Peter. However, when we become conscious of our past, or our real-life situation, we succumb to fear. Sadly, we forget that the Lord is with us in our Journey.

Today’s reading has a very important lesson for us. First, it presents a typical picture of our journey of faith. It reminds us that, paralyzed by fear, one can hardly make any progress in life.

However, there is always a very powerful antidote to fear. It is called, faith. This antidote is manifested through courage in the presence of the Lord and our Savior Jesus Christ.

Why is my courage gone? Why am I sinking? What am I afraid of? The psalmist tells us that: “This poor man called, and the Lord heard him; he saved him out of all his troubles” (Ps 34: 6).

So, like Peter, let us cry out: “Lord help me,” because, “everyone who calls on the name of the Lord will be saved (Rom 10:13), and his faith restored.

Peace be with you.

Maranatha!

Lunes de la XVIII semana del Tiempo Ordinario, Año A

Hombre de poca fe, ¿por qué dudaste

 Lecturas: 1ra: Jer 28:1-17; Sal: 118; Ev: Mt 14:22-36

Esta breve reflexión fue escrita por el Padre Canice Chukwuemeka Njoku, C.S.Sp. Es un sacerdote católico y  miembro de la Congregación del Espíritu Santo (Espirítanos). Es un misionero en Puerto Rico, la isla del encanto. Es el Canciller de la Diócesis de Fajardo-Humacao, Puerto Rico; Párroco de la Parroquia la Resurrección del Señor, Canóvanas, y el Superior Mayor la Congregación del Espíritu Santo (Espirítanos), Circunscripción de Puerto Rico y Republica Dominicana. Para más detalles y comentarios se puede contactarlo alcanice_c_njoku@yahoo.com, cancilleriadfh@gmail.com, canicechukwuemeka@gmail.com

Hoy, el lunes de la decimoctava semana del tiempo ordinario, Mateo nos presenta un dramático encuentro de fe entre Cristo y sus discípulos.

A veces en la vida, uno puede sentirse tan frustrado por las dificultades hasta el punto de que uno ser demasiado temeroso de avanzar en la vida. Tal estado podría afectar el proceso mental, y la percepción de la vida de uno.

Tal fue el caso de los pobres discípulos de Cristo en el evangelio de hoy representado por Pedro. Mientras todavía luchaba con una tormenta peligrosa que amenazaba su vida, Cristo vino a su rescate caminando en el mar.

Ya paralizado por el miedo de la tormenta, Peter tomó a Cristo por un fantasma. Obviamente, la sal fue añadida a su herida. Por supuesto, su miedo era justificable. No es normal para un ser humano andar por el mar sin el hundirse.

El resto de este episodio es muy interesante. Cristo le aseguró a Pedro: “Tranquilícense y no teman. Soy yo.” Pedro le hizo una petición urgente: Si eres tú, mándame ir a ti caminando sobre el agua”.

Cristo lo invitó: “¡Ven!” Pedro se metió en el agua, dio unos pasos, y comenzó a hundirse. Esto fue a pesar de la seguridad que Cristo le dio. Por supuesto, Cristo lo rescató.

A veces en la vida, empezamos bien como Pedro. Sin embargo, cuando nos volvemos conscientes de nuestro pasado o de nuestra situación sucumbimos al miedo. Olvidamos que el Señor está con nosotros en nuestro viaje.

La lectura de hoy tiene una lección muy importante para nosotros. Nos presenta una imagen típica de nuestro camino de fe. Nos recuerda que, paralizado por el miedo, uno no puede progresar en la vida.

Sin embargo, siempre hay un antídoto muy poderoso para el miedo. Se llama, fe. Este antídoto se manifiesta a través del valor en la presencia del Señor.

¿Por qué se ha ido mi valentía? ¿Por qué estoy hundiendo? ¿De qué cosa tengo miedo? El salmista nos dice: “Este pobre hombre llamó, y el Señor le oyó; él lo salvó de todos sus problemas” (Sal 34: 6).

Así que, como Pedro, gritemos: “Señor ayúdame”, porque “todos los que invocan el nombre del Señor serán salvos (Ro 10:13), y su fe restaurada.

La paz sea con ustedes

¡Maranatha!

 

Saturday, XVII Week of Ordinary Time, Year A

Alphonsus Liguori, Pray for us

Readings: 1st: Jer 18:1-6; Ps 145; Gos: Mt 13:47-53

This brief reflection was written by Fr. Njoku Canice Chukwuemeka, C.S.Sp. He is a Catholic Priest and a member of the Congregation of the Holy Spirit (Spiritans). He is a missionary in Puerto Rico, the island of enchantment. He is the Chancellor of the Dioceses of Fajardo-Humacao, Puerto Rico; the Parish Priest of Parroquia la Resurrección del Senor, Canovanas and the Major Superior of the Congregation of the Holy Spirit (Spiritans), Circumscription of Puerto Rico and Dominican Republic. For more details and comments contact him at:  canice_c_njoku@yahoo.com, canicechukwuemeka@gmail.com.

Today, the Saturday of the seventeenth week of ordinary time, the Church honors Saint Alphonsus Liguori, Bishop and Doctor of the Church.

Alphonsus was born in 1696. He became a doctor of canon and civil law at the age of sixteen. He practiced for some years, before giving his life to the service of Christ and humanity as a priest.

He was appointed bishop of Sant’ Agata Dei in 1762, where he corrected abuses, restored churches, reformed seminaries, and promoted missions. Alphonsus was the founder of the Congregation of the Most Holy Redeemer, well known as Redemptorists. He was a man of excellent morals and spirituality

He died of a painful illness on August 1, 1787. In 1839, he was canonized, and later declared a Doctor of the Church in 1871.

Today’s gospel narrates the events that led to the murder of John the Baptist, the prophet of prophets. Once, I asked my parishioners, what Herodias did with the head of John the Baptist after receiving it.

Only one person attempted it this way: “She dug a hole and buried it.” His guess could be as good as that of any of us.

The truth is that apart from satisfying her evil ego and ventilating her anger, her success as well as her final “trophy” were worthless. This is because, it did not even buy her the peace she needed.

John the Baptist was the victim of corruption and arrogance of an evil government. He was not afraid to speak out when he saw corruption in the land. So, he died for what he preached, for what is just and true.

His life continues to challenge all of us, who have been called to be the light for our society. Unfortunately, at times, we are too afraid to confront evil, because of our excessive instinct for self-preservation.

Indeed, John bore witness both with his words and his life. He gave everything for his mission, and fulfilled those blessed words of Christ: “Whoever loses his life for my sake will find it” (Mt 16:25).

So, let us pray that through the intercession of Alphonsus, the patron saint of moral theologians, we may always stand firm for whatever is true, noble, right, pure, lovely, admirable, excellent or praiseworthy” (Phil 4:8).

Saint Alphonsus Liguori, Pray for Us

Peace be with you.

Maranatha!

Sábado, XVII Semana de Tiempo Ordinario, Año A

San Alfonso María de Ligorio, Ruega por Nosotros

Lecturas: 1ra: Jer 26:1-9; Sal: 68; Ev: Mt 13:54-58

Esta breve reflexión fue escrita por el Padre Canice Chukwuemeka Njoku, C.S.Sp. Es un sacerdote católico y  miembro de la Congregación del Espíritu Santo (Espirítanos). Es un misionero en Puerto Rico, la isla del encanto. Es el Canciller de la Diócesis de Fajardo-Humacao, Puerto Rico; Párroco de la Parroquia la Resurrección del Señor, Canóvanas, y el Superior Mayor la Congregación del Espíritu Santo (Espirítanos), Circunscripción de Puerto Rico y Republica Dominicana. Para más detalles y comentarios se puede contactarlo al: canice_c_njoku@yahoo.com, cancilleriadfh@gmail.com, canicechukwuemeka@gmail.com

Hoy, el sábado de la decimoséptima semana del tiempo ordinario, la Iglesia honra a san Alfonso Ligorio, obispo y doctor de la Iglesia.

Alfonso Ligorio nació en 1696. Se convirtió en doctor en derecho canónico y civil a la edad de dieciséis años. Practicó durante algunos años, antes de entregarse al servicio de Cristo y la humanidad como sacerdote.

Fue nombrado obispo de Sant’ Ágata Dei en 1762, donde corrigió abusos, restauró iglesias, reformó seminarios y promovió misiones. Alfonso fue el fundador de la Congregación del Santísimo Redentor, bien conocida como Redentoristas. Era un hombre de excelente morales y espiritualidad.

Murió de una dolorosa enfermedad el 1 de agosto de 1787. En 1839 fue canonizado, y más tarde declarado Doctor de la Iglesia en 1871.

El Evangelio de hoy narra los acontecimientos que condujeron al asesinato de Juan el Bautista, el profeta de los profetas. Una vez, pregunté a mis feligreses qué hizo Herodía con la cabeza de Juan después de recibirla. Una solo persona la intentó de esta manera: “Cavó un agujero y la enterró.” Su conjetura podría ser tan buena como la de cualquiera de nosotros.

La verdad es que aparte de satisfacer su mal ego y ventilar su ira, su éxito, así como su último “trofeo” no valían la pena. Esto es porque, ni siquiera le compró la paz que buscaba.

Juan el Bautista fue víctima de la corrupción y la arrogancia de un gobierno malvado. No tenía miedo de hablar cuando vio la corrupción en la tierra. Así que murió por lo que predicó, por lo que es justo y verdadero.

Su vida sigue desafiando a todos nosotros, que hemos sido llamados a ser la luz de nuestra sociedad. Por desgracia, a veces debido a nuestro instinto excesivo de autopreservación tenemos demasiado miedo de enfrentar el mal.

De hecho, Juan dio testimonio tanto con sus palabras como con su vida. Lo dio todo por su misión, y cumplió esas benditas palabras de Cristo: “Quien pierda su vida por mí causa la encontrará” (Mt 16:25).

Así que oremos para que, por la intercesión de Alfonso, el santo patrón de los teólogos morales, podamos estar siempre firmes por lo que es verdadero, noble, correcto, puro, hermoso, admirable, excelente o digno de alabanza” (Flp 4:8).

San Alfonso María de Ligorio, Ruega por Nosotros

La paz sea con ustedes

¡Maranatha!

Homily for the Eighteenth Sunday of Ordinary Time, Year A

God’s Unconditional Love: Heals and Frees Us

Readings: 1st: Is 55: 1-3; Ps 55; 2nd: Rom 8: 35. 37-39; Gos: Mt 14: 13-21

This brief reflection was written by Fr. Njoku Canice Chukwuemeka, C.S.Sp. He is a Catholic Priest and a member of the Congregation of the Holy Spirit (Spiritans). He is a missionary in Puerto Rico, the island of enchantment. He is the Chancellor of the Dioceses of Fajardo-Humacao, Puerto Rico; the Parish Priest of Parroquia la Resurrección del Senor, Canovanas and the Major Superior of the Congregation of the Holy Spirit (Spiritans), Circumscription of Puerto Rico and Dominican Republic. For more details and comments contact him at:  canice_c_njoku@yahoo.com, canicechukwuemeka@gmail.com.

On this 18th Sunday of ordinary time our attention is drawn once again to the unconditional love of God fully manifested in his Son Jesus Christ. This great love which we celebrate today, as well as being the source of our entire life, equally sustains our life with the food of the Eucharist, made visible in Jesus Christ.

In our first reading today, God extends a special and universal invitation to all of us and offers us everything free of charge. His gifts, his love, and care are as free and limitless as the air we breathe.  Most important, Christ knows our basic needs. The only thing God wants from us as he invites us today is: “Come…listen, listen to me…pay attention, come to me, listen and your soul will live…”

What a simple condition this is? All he wants is “come”, listen”, and “pay attention!” This is a universal invitation. Also, this invitation expresses the urgency of the matter. It is urgent because, the longer we delay, the harder it will be for us to come. Also, there will be less opportunity for us. Through this invitation, Isaiah reminds us that God wants us to experience his love, comfort, and to enjoy his provision for us (Is 40:1).

In the second reading, Paul speaks with great confidence about the love of God for us. Of course, he speaks as one who has experienced this love. He assures us that nothing can come between us and the love of Christ, “not troubles, persecutions, lacks…for I am certain of this, neither death nor life, nor any created thing can ever come between us and the love of God…” Paul stresses the inability of all these to separate us from the love of Christ. None of these is capable of diminishing the of love and friendship that exists between Christ and every true believer.

In today’s Gospel, Jesus practically demonstrated and manifested his love for us, his people. The feeding of the five thousand shows the profound generosity of God and his great love towards us. The twelve baskets full of fish and loaves that were leftover show the overflowing generosity of God’s gifts to us – gifts that bring blessing, healing, strength, and refreshment. God never rests in caring for our needs. Jesus never disappoints those who earnestly seek him.

What do we learn from today’s gospel? Quiet a lot! First, Jesus both sympathizes and empathizes with us in our distress. He feels what we feel and comes to our aid. Second, whenever we come to him, he never casts us away. Third, he defiles all odds in order to make us comfortable. He makes the impossible happen just for our good. Fourth, the miracle of the multiplication of the loaves, is a sign that prefigures the superabundance of the unique bread of the Eucharist, and the love of God which sustains us on our journey.

The love of God continues to heal us every day of our life. It continues multiplying our loaves, and it continues to comfort, and satisfy us. His banner over us is love (Song of Sons 2: 4). When God gives, he gives abundantly.

Finally, the little ones who presented their loaves and fish were instruments of love in Christ’s hands. Jesus needed those items to perform his miracle of love. So, they participated in the miracle. Today, Jesus also invites us participate in his miracles.

Peace be with you all!

Maranatha!

Homilia del Decimoctavo Domingo del Tiempo Ordinario, Año A

El Amor Incondicional de Dios: Nos Sana y Libera

Lecturas: 1ra: Is 55: 1-3; Ps: 55: 1-3; 2da: Rom 8: 35. 37-39; Ev: Mt 14: 13-21

Esta breve reflexión fue escrita por el Padre Canice Chukwuemeka Njoku, C.S.Sp. Es un sacerdote católico y  miembro de la Congregación del Espíritu Santo (Espirítanos). Es un misionero en Puerto Rico, la isla del encanto. Es el Canciller de la Diócesis de Fajardo-Humacao, Puerto Rico; Párroco de la Parroquia la Resurrección del Señor, Canóvanas, y el Superior Mayor la Congregación del Espíritu Santo (Espirítanos), Circunscripción de Puerto Rico y Republica Dominicana. Para más detalles y comentarios se puede contactarlo al: canice_c_njoku@yahoo.com, cancilleriadfh@gmail.com, canicechukwuemeka@gmail.com.

En este decimoctavo Domingo del tiempo ordinario, la iglesia llama nuestra atención una vez más al amor incondicional de Dios manifestado plenamente en su hijo, Jesucristo. Este amor nos sostiene a través de la Eucaristía.

En nuestra primera lectura, Dios extiende una invitación especial y universal a todos nosotros. Nos ofrece todo gratuitamente. Lo único que Dios necesita es: “venga…escuche, preste atención y tu alma vivirá “.

Esta es una invitación universal. Es urgente porque, cuanto más retrasamos, menos oportunidades tendremos. A través de esta invitación, Isaías nos recuerda que Dios quiere que experimentemos su amor, consuelo y provisión (Is 40.1).

En nuestra segunda lectura, Pablo habla con gran confianza del amor de Dios por nosotros. Por supuesto, habla como uno que ha experimentado este amor. Él nos asegura que nada puede separarnos del amor de Cristo: “Ni siquiera problemas, persecuciones, carencias. Ni la muerte, ni la vida, ni ninguna cosa creada puede separarnos del amor de Dios.” Pablo enfatiza la incapacidad de todos estos para separarnos del amor de Cristo. Ninguno de estos es capaz de disminuir el amor y la amistad que existe entre Cristo y todo verdadero creyente.

En el Evangelio de hoy, Jesús demostró prácticamente su amor por su pueblo. La alimentación de cinco mil personas muestra la profunda generosidad y amor de Dios hacia nosotros. Las doce canastas de pescado y pan que se recogieron después del milagro de Cristo es también un signo de la generosidad de Dios.

Es una señal de los dones de Dios a nosotros. Es decir, dones que traen bendición, sanación y refrescan tanto nuestra alma y cuerpo. Dios nunca está cansado de cuidarnos, y Jesús nunca defrauda a aquellos que lo buscan fervientemente.

¿Qué aprendemos del Evangelio de hoy? Primero, Jesús simpatiza y empatiza con nosotros en nuestra angustia. Siente lo que sentimos y viene a nuestra ayuda. Segundo, cada vez que venimos a él, nunca nos echa fuera. Tercero, Cristo hace lo imposible posible por nuestro bien. Cuarto, el milagro de la multiplicación de los panes, es un signo que prefigura la superabundancia la Eucaristía. Expresa la grandeza del amor con lo que Dios nos sostiene en nuestro viaje.

Finalmente, el amor de Dios nos sigue sanando todos los días de nuestra vida. Sigue multiplicando nuestros panes. Cristo nos sigue confortando y nutriendo. Siempre, sobre nosotros enarboló su bandera de amo (Cantares 2:4). Cuando Dios da, da abundantemente. Los que presentaron sus panes y peces fueron instrumentos del amor de Dios en las manos de Cristo. Por lo tanto, participaron en el milagro de Jesús. Cristo cuenta con nosotros para proveerlos en el momento adecuado.

¡La paz sea con ustedes!

¡Maranatha!

Friday, XVII Week of Ordinary Time, Year A

Saint Ignatius of Loyola, Pray for Us

Readings: 1st: Jer 18:1-6; Ps 145; Gos: Mt 13:47-53

This brief reflection was written by Fr. Njoku Canice Chukwuemeka, C.S.Sp. He is a Catholic Priest and a member of the Congregation of the Holy Spirit (Spiritans). He is a missionary in Puerto Rico, the island of enchantment. He is the Chancellor of the Dioceses of Fajardo-Humacao, Puerto Rico; the Parish Priest of Parroquia la Resurrección del Senor, Canovanas and the Major Superior of the Congregation of the Holy Spirit (Spiritans), Circumscription of Puerto Rico and Dominican Republic. For more details and comments contact him at:  canice_c_njoku@yahoo.com, canicechukwuemeka@gmail.com.

Today, the Friday of the seventeenth week of ordinary time, the Church honors Saint Ignatius of Loyola, Priest.

Ignatius was born in Spain in 1491. As a young man, he was a captain in the military until he suffered a serious fracture on his left leg in 1521.

As Paul reminds us that, “all things work for good for those who love God, who are called according to his purpose” (Rom 8:28), this misfortune initiated a new phase of life, and journey of faith for Ignatius.

He took advantage of the opportunity God presented to him, received his miracle, gave his life to Christ as a priest, and became one of the Church’s greatest theologians.

Ignatius was the founder of the Society of Jesus, popularly known as the Jesuits. So, one of his greatest contribution and gift to the Church is the multitude of priests and religious that has crowned his effort.

After much work and service to God and humanity, Ignatius died in Rome on 31 July 1556, and was canonized on 12 March 1622.

In today’s gospel, Christ made a very important statement: “A prophet is not without honor except in his native place and in his own house.” Indeed, it is said that “familiarity brings contempt.” In everyday life, we see this happen as it happened to Christ among his own people.

Rejection hurts much. This is especially, when it is comes from one’s own folks (Jn 1:11). However, the one who loses more is he who ignorantly rejects or do not appreciate what he has.

There are some other reasons why like the relatives of Jesus, we do not appreciate, or honor our own brothers and sisters, jealousy and pride. These are also embedded in the questions of Christ’s relatives.

Hence, today’s gospel reminds us that we must eschew jealousy, pride and learn to appreciate what we have. It also means that, we should give honor to whom it is due, irrespective of how familiar we are with the person. This will help us and our own community prosper and grow.

Finally, faith is the foundation of any miracle. Without it, nothing will work for us. Christ could not do much for his people because of their incredulity. The more we lack faith, both in ourselves and in God, the more we diminish the possibility of our own miracle and progress in life.

Saint Ignatius of Loyola, Pray for Us

Peace be with you.

Maranatha!

Viernes XVII Semana de Tiempo Ordinario, Año A

San Ignacio de Loyola, Ruega por Nosotros

Lecturas: 1ra: Jer 26:1-9; Sal: 68; Ev: Mt 13:54-58

Esta breve reflexión fue escrita por el Padre Canice Chukwuemeka Njoku, C.S.Sp. Es un sacerdote católico y  miembro de la Congregación del Espíritu Santo (Espirítanos). Es un misionero en Puerto Rico, la isla del encanto. Es el Canciller de la Diócesis de Fajardo-Humacao, Puerto Rico; Párroco de la Parroquia la Resurrección del Señor, Canóvanas, y el Superior Mayor la Congregación del Espíritu Santo (Espirítanos), Circunscripción de Puerto Rico y Republica Dominicana. Para más detalles y comentarios se puede contactarlo alcanice_c_njoku@yahoo.com, cancilleriadfh@gmail.com, canicechukwuemeka@gmail.com.

Hoy, el viernes de la decimoséptima semana del tiempo ordinario, la Iglesia honra a San Ignacio de Loyola, Sacerdote.

Ignatius nació en España en 1491. Como joven, fue capitán del ejército hasta que sufrió una fractura grave en la pierna izquierda en 1521.

Como Pablo nos recuerda que, “todo contribuye para el bien de los que aman a Dios, que son llamados según su propósito” (Ro 8:28), esta desgracia inició una nueva fase de vida, y un nuevo camino de fe para Ignacio de Loyola.

Se aprovechó la oportunidad que Dios le presentó, recibió su milagro, entregó su vida a Cristo como sacerdote, y se convirtió en uno de los más grandes teólogos de la Iglesia.

Ignacio fue el fundador de la Sociedad de Jesús, popularmente conocido como Jesuitas. Así que, una de sus mayores contribuciones y regalos a la Iglesia es la multitud de sacerdotes y religiosos que ha coronado su esfuerzo.

Después de mucho trabajo y servicio a Dios y a la humanidad, Ignacio murió en Roma el 31 de julio de 1556, y fue canonizado el 12 de marzo de 1622.

En el evangelio de hoy, Cristo hizo una declaración muy importante: “Un profeta no es despreciado más que en su patria y en su casa.” De hecho, se dice que “la familiaridad trae desprecio”. En la vida cotidiana, vemos que esto sucede, como le sucedió a Cristo entre su propio pueblo.

El rechazo duele mucho. Esto es especialmente, cuando proviene de la propia gente de uno (Jn 1:11). Sin embargo, el que pierde más es el que rechaza ignorantemente, o no aprecia lo que tiene.

Hay otras razones por las que, como los parientes de Jesús, no apreciamos, ni honramos a nuestros propios hermanos, celos y orgullo. Estas también están incrustadas en las preguntas de los parientes de Cristo.

Por lo tanto, el evangelio de hoy nos recuerda que debemos evitar los celos, el orgullo y aprender a apreciar lo que tenemos. Significa que, debemos dar honor a quien se debe, no importa cuán familiar que estemos con la persona. Esto nos ayudará, y a nuestra comunidad a prosperar y crecer.

Finalmente, la fe es el fundamento de cualquier milagro. Sin ella, nada funcionará para nosotros. Cristo no podía hacer mucho por su pueblo debido a su incredulidad. Cuanto más nos falta fe tanto en nosotros mismos como en Dios, más disminuimos la posibilidad de nuestro propio milagro y progreso en la vida.

San Ignacio de Loyola, Ruega por Nosotros.

La paz sea con ustedes

¡Maranatha!

Thursday, XVII Week of Ordinary Time, Year A

The last Parable of the Kingdom of God

Readings: 1st: Jer 18:1-6; Ps 145; Gos: Mt 13:47-53

This brief reflection was written by Fr. Njoku Canice Chukwuemeka, C.S.Sp. He is a Catholic Priest and a member of the Congregation of the Holy Spirit (Spiritans). He is a missionary in Puerto Rico, the island of enchantment. He is the Chancellor of the Dioceses of Fajardo-Humacao, Puerto Rico; the Parish Priest of Parroquia la Resurrección del Senor, Canovanas and the Major Superior of the Congregation of the Holy Spirit (Spiritans), Circumscription of Puerto Rico and Dominican Republic. For more details and comments contact him at:  canice_c_njoku@yahoo.com, canicechukwuemeka@gmail.com.

Today, the Thursday of the seventeenth week of ordinary time, Christ concludes his teaching on the kingdom of God with parables.

Christ compares the kingdom of God to, “a net thrown into the sea, which collects fish of every kind. When it is full, they haul it ashore and sit down to put what is good into buckets. What is bad they throw away.”

It suffices to note that, only Matthew recorded this last parable. So, unlike the other parables of Christ, this one stands alone in the gospel of Matthew, and has no parallel in the other three gospels.

It is a very practical parable that depicts the everyday life and activity of the disciples of Christ, most of whom were fishermen, or at least, depended on fishing for their daily meal. So, it makes much sense to them.

Definitely, not every sea creature that the net catches in the sea is useful to the fisherman. So, like a wise man, he has to patiently take his time to separate the good from the bad catch.

Therefore, like the parable of the wheat and the weed (Mt 13: 24-30), this last parable points to the wisdom of God, the righteous judge, who will separate the good from the bad at the end of time.

Today as in every good discourse, Christ makes a concluding statement on his teaching on the kingdom of God: “Every scribe who has been instructed in the kingdom of heaven is like the head of a household who brings from his storeroom both the new and the old.”

This concluding statement is very important for two reasons. First, it speaks to his critics, the scribes (authorities) who though, were wise in the things of this world, did not make much effort to gain the wisdom of the kingdom of God.

Second, it reminds all of us that, while the wisdom (qualifications, degrees and titles) we acquire for our survival in this world is good, striving for the wisdom that qualifies us for the kingdom of God guarantees our future.

In other words, our concern or search for reality and its fulfillment, must involve both the temporal and the spiritual for us to be truly wise.

Peace be with you.

Maranatha!

Jueves XVII Semana de Tiempo Ordinario, Año A

La última Parábola del Reino de Dios

Lecturas: 1ra: Jer 18:1-6; Sal: 145; Ev: Mt 13:47-53

Esta breve reflexión fue escrita por el Padre Canice Chukwuemeka Njoku, C.S.Sp. Es un sacerdote católico y  miembro de la Congregación del Espíritu Santo (Espirítanos). Es un misionero en Puerto Rico, la isla del encanto. Es el Canciller de la Diócesis de Fajardo-Humacao, Puerto Rico; Párroco de la Parroquia la Resurrección del Señor, Canóvanas, y el Superior Mayor la Congregación del Espíritu Santo (Espirítanos), Circunscripción de Puerto Rico y Republica Dominicana. Para más detalles y comentarios se puede contactarlo alcanice_c_njoku@yahoo.com, cancilleriadfh@gmail.com, canicechukwuemeka@gmail.com.

Hoy, el jueves de la decimoséptima semana del tiempo ordinario, Cristo concluye su enseñanza del reino de Dios con parábolas.

Cristo compara el reino de Dios con, “una red que los pescadores echan en el mar y recoge toda clase de peces. Cuando se llena la red, los pescadores la sacan a la playa y se sientan a escoger los pescados; ponen los buenos en canastos y tiran los malos.”

Baste señalar que, sólo Mateo registró esta última parábola. Por lo tanto, a diferencia de las otras parábolas de Cristo, esta parábola está sola en el evangelio de Mateo, y no tiene paralelo en los otros tres evangelios.

Es una parábola muy práctica que describe la vida y la actividad diaria de los discípulos de Cristo, la mayoría de los cuales eran pescadores, o al menos, dependían de la pesca para su comida diaria. Así que, hace mucho sentido para ellos.

Definitivamente, no toda criatura marina que la red captura en el mar es útil para el pescador. Así que, como un hombre sabio, tiene que tomarse su tiempo pacientemente para separar lo bueno de lo malo.

Por lo tanto, como la parábola del trigo y la cizaña (Mt 13:24-30), esta última parábola apunta a la sabiduría de Dios, el juez justo, que separará lo bueno de lo malo al final de los tiempos.

Hoy como en cada discurso bueno, Cristo hace una declaración concluyente de su enseñanza del reino de Dios: “Todo escriba instruido en las cosas del Reino de los cielos es semejante al padre de familia, que va sacando de su tesoro cosas nuevas y cosas antiguas.”

Esta declaración concluyente es muy importante por dos razones. Primero, habla a sus críticos, los escribas (autoridades) que, aunque eran sabios en las cosas de este mundo, no hicieron mucho esfuerzo para ganar la sabiduría del reino de Dios.

Segundo, nos recuerda que, mientras que la sabiduría (calificaciones, grados y títulos) que adquirimos para nuestra supervivencia en este mundo es buena, procurar la sabiduría que nos califica para el reino de Dios garantiza nuestro futuro.

En otras palabras, nuestra preocupación o búsqueda de la realidad y su realización debe involucrar tanto lo temporal como lo espiritual para que seamos verdaderamente sabios.

La paz sea con ustedes

¡Maranatha!