Friday, XXX Week of Ordinary Time, Year A

Is it lawful to cure on the Sabbath or not?

Readings: 1st: Phil 1:1-11; Ps 111; Gos: Lk 14:1-6

This brief reflection was written by Fr. Njoku Canice Chukwuemeka, C.S.Sp. He is a Catholic Priest and a member of the Congregation of the Holy Spirit (Spiritans). He is a missionary in Puerto Rico, the island of enchantment. He is the Chancellor of the Dioceses of Fajardo-Humacao, Puerto Rico; the Parish Priest of Parroquia la Resurrección del Senor, Canóvanas and the Major Superior of the Congregation of the Holy Spirit (Spiritans), Circumscription of Puerto Rico and Dominican Republic. For more details and comments contact him at:  canice_c_njoku@yahoo.com, canicechukwuemeka@gmail.com.

Today, Friday of the thirtieth week of ordinary time, Luke presents dialogue between Christ and the Pharisees before he healed a man suffering from dropsy.

Christ asked the Pharisees, “Is it lawful to cure on the sabbath or not?” Of course, they did not answer this question. However, in their heart, undoubtedly, their answer is “it is not lawful because the law forbids it.”

According to Jewish tradition, work is prohibited on the Sabbath. So, the Pharisees were strict in their defense and enforcement of this law.

Yes, the law is everything for the Pharisees, and must be observed rigidly; even when human life is at risk, one must not go against the law.

An important lesson for us today is the difference between the priority of Christ and that of his critics. For Christ, the most important priority was the restoration and well-being of his people and the entire humanity.

While for the Pharisees, it was to enact and protect more laws that only made life and charity more difficult for the people.

Some Christians prefer to be referred to as “conservative Christians.” Their actions and words show that they wish to be: “more Catholic than the pope.”

Of course, there is nothing wrong with conserving what is good. However, the problem is in becoming a “legalistic Christian.” 

Unfortunately, legalism can easily become the archenemy of the fundamental Christian virtue of Charity. This was the problem of the Pharisees and the Scribes and the problem of some of today’s Christians.

The more legalistic and rigid we become, the more insensitive we become to others’ immediate needs and plight. In this way, we lose the capacity to empathize with others and, consequently, the real essence of life.

Christ was not against the sabbath law, but he teaches us that, at times, Christian charity and mercy can prevail for a greater good over a particular law, especially when its “violation” causes no harm to anyone.

So, the difference between Christ’s priority of Christ and his critics’ is the difference between a charitable and a legalistic Christian.

Peace be with you

Maranatha!

Viernes, XXX Semana de Tiempo Ordinario, Año A

¿Está permitido curar en sábado o no?

Lecturas: 1ra: Flp1:1-11; Sal: 111; Ev: Lc 14, 1-6

Esta breve reflexión fue escrita por el Padre Canice Chukwuemeka Njoku, C.S.Sp. Es un sacerdote católico y  miembro de la Congregación del Espíritu Santo (Espirítanos). Es un misionero en Puerto Rico, la isla del encanto. Es el Canciller de la Diócesis de Fajardo-Humacao, Puerto Rico; Párroco de la Parroquia la Resurrección del Señor, Canóvanas, y el Superior Mayor la Congregación del Espíritu Santo (Espirítanos), Circunscripción de Puerto Rico y Republica Dominicana. Para más detalles y comentarios se puede contactarlo alcanice_c_njoku@yahoo.com, cancilleriadfh@gmail.com, canicechukwuemeka@gmail.com.

Hoy, el viernes de la trigésima semana del tiempo ordinario, Lucas presenta el diálogo entre Cristo y los fariseos antes de sanar a un enfermo de hidropesía.

Cristo preguntó a los fariseos: “¿Está permitido curar en sábado o no?” Por supuesto, no respondieron a esta pregunta. Sin embargo, en su corazón, sin duda, su respuesta es “no es lícita porque la ley lo prohíbe”.

Según la tradición judía, el trabajo está prohibido en el sábado. Así que los fariseos eran estrictos en su defensa y aplicación de esta ley.

Sí, la ley es todo para los fariseos, y debe ser observada de manera rígida; aun cuando la vida humana está en riesgo, uno no debe ir en contra de la ley.

Una lección importante para nosotros hoy es la diferencia entre la prioridad de Cristo y la de sus críticos. Para Cristo, la prioridad más importante era la restauración y el bienestar de su pueblo y de toda la humanidad.

Mientras que, para los fariseos, era para promulgar y proteger más leyes que sólo hacían la vida y la caridad más difíciles para el pueblo.

Algunos cristianos prefieren ser referidos como “cristianos conservadores”. Sus acciones y palabras muestran que desean ser: “más católicos que el Papa”.

Por supuesto, no hay nada de malo en conservar lo que es bueno. Sin embargo, el problema está en convertirse en un “cristiano legalista”.

Desafortunadamente, el legalismo puede convertirse fácilmente en el archienemigo de la virtud cristiana fundamental de la Caridad. Este fue el problema de los fariseos y los escribas y el problema de algunos de los cristianos de nuestro tiempo.

Cuanto más legalistas y rígidos nos volvemos, más insensibles nos volvemos ante las necesidades inmediatas y la difícil situación de los demás. De esta manera, perdemos la capacidad de empatizar con los demás y, en consecuencia, la verdadera esencia de la vida.

Cristo no estaba en contra de la ley del sábado, pero nos enseña que, a veces, la caridad y la misericordia cristianas pueden prevalecer por un bien mayor sobre una ley particular, especialmente cuando su “violación” no causa daño a nadie.

Por lo tanto, la diferencia entre la prioridad de Cristo y la de sus críticos es la diferencia entre un cristiano caritativo y un cristiano legalista.

La paz sea con ustedes

¡Maranatha!

Homily for Solemnity of all Saints (31st Sunday Ordinary Time, Year A)

They Came, they Struggled, and they Conquered

Readings: 1st: Rev 7, 2-4. 9-14; Ps: 23; 2nd: 1 Jn 3, 1-3; Gos: Mt 5, 1-12

This brief reflection was written by Fr. Njoku Canice Chukwuemeka, C.S.Sp. He is a Catholic Priest and a member of the Congregation of the Holy Spirit (Spiritans). He is a missionary in Puerto Rico, the island of enchantment. He is the Chancellor of the Dioceses of Fajardo-Humacao, Puerto Rico; the Parish Priest of Parroquia la Resurrección del Senor, Canóvanas and the Major Superior of the Congregation of the Holy Spirit (Spiritans), Circumscription of Puerto Rico and Dominican Republic. For more details and comments contact him at:  canice_c_njoku@yahoo.com, canicechukwuemeka@gmail.com.

“They have no speech; they use no words; no sound is heard from them. Yet their voice goes out into all the earth, their words to the ends of the world. In the heavens, God has pitched a tent for the sun. (Ps. 19, 4-5)”.

Today, the church gives us the opportunity to celebrate our unsung heroes. The Feast of All Saints is a celebration in recognition of the efforts made by many “Faithful” who are not officially canonized or beatified by the church.

Contrary to the belief of one known Christian sect, that: “Only one hundred and forty-four thousand people will be saved or enter God’s kingdom,” our first reading today gives us hope that there are enough rooms in God’s kingdom for anyone that triumphs. So, All Saints refers to: “The crowd so great that no one could count. They were individuals of all nations and races, of all peoples and languages.”

This reading portrays two essential things. The first is that apart from the officially canonized saints, many more have lived heroic and virtuous lives. They are unsung by men, but God, the Creator, and Father recognize their efforts and struggle. They are: “Those who have washed their robes in the blood of the Lamb,” and now, sing: “Victory, salvation, honor, and glory belong to our God because he is Love!” Second, it also shows that God’s love is for all nations.

Hence, today’s second reading reminds us of how much God loves us. All Saints (the triumphant church) now enjoy the fullness of this love. We (“the militant church”), who are still living also, enjoy God’s love. It is this same love that sustains us in our journey daily journey. However, when we triumph like them, we shall become transformed and share in the fullness of this love.  Hence, John tells us: “Brothers, now we are the children of God, but it has not been manifested what we shall look like at the end.” We shall look like the glorified Christ and the saints. We shall share in the fullness of God’s love.

Today, our gospel gives us a perfect credential of all the Saints that we honor today. They are the real Blessed and Happy. Each one of them falls into one or more of these categories.  They were poor in spirit. They suffered and wept for the salvation of others. They hungered and thirsted for justices and the truth. In the process, they were greatly persecuted and bruised. Despite all these, they were pure in their hearts, merciful to all, and worked for peace.

While this matches the profile and the present reward of All Saints, it also leaves us with great hope and promise. All saints were mortal human beings like each one of us. They came, saw, struggled, and they conquered. The same grace that helped them is still available for us today. The good news is that we shall also enjoy this exact profile and reward if we run and endure the way they did.

The lessons from today’s celebration are great. Many times, I have heard some people say things like: “Look, I have been working and doing my best, yet no one recognizes me. Nobody knows that I exist here. No one cares about my efforts. I do not count or mean anything to anybody” If we understand who God is, we will not think or speak this way.

The truth is that human beings may not appreciate your efforts and worth, but God does. This is because he knows that you are there. You count, you mean a lot to him, and you are on His “payment list.” He loves you and is praying and waiting patiently for you to overcome this world to share in the fullness of his love. So, like All Saints, you are among the class of people that the Lord is searching for. All Saints, Pray for us!

Peace be with you!

Maranatha!

Homilía de la Solemnidad de Todos los Santos (Trigésimo Primer Domingo del Tiempo Ordinario, Año A)

Honrando todos los Santos: Vinieron, Vieron, Lucharon y Vencieron

Lectura: 1ra: Ap. 7:2-4. 9-14; Sal 23; 2da:1 Jn 3:1-3; Ev: Mt 5:1-12

Esta breve reflexión fue escrita por el Padre Canice Chukwuemeka Njoku, C.S.Sp. Es un sacerdote católico y  miembro de la Congregación del Espíritu Santo (Espirítanos). Es un misionero en Puerto Rico, la isla del encanto. Es el Canciller de la Diócesis de Fajardo-Humacao, Puerto Rico; Párroco de la Parroquia la Resurrección del Señor, Canóvanas, y el Superior Mayor la Congregación del Espíritu Santo (Espirítanos), Circunscripción de Puerto Rico y Republica Dominicana. Para más detalles y comentarios se puede contactarlo alcanice_c_njoku@yahoo.com, cancilleriadfh@gmail.com, canicechukwuemeka@gmail.com.

“No tienen ningún discurso, no utilizan palabras; nadie escucha de ellos. Sin embargo, su voz sale en toda la tierra, sus palabras hasta los confines del mundo. En el cielo, Dios ha lanzado una tienda para el sol.” (Sal 19, 4-5).

Hoy, la Iglesia nos da la oportunidad de celebrar a nuestros héroes desconocidos. La fiesta de todos los Santos es una celebración en reconocimiento a los esfuerzos realizados por muchos “fieles” no oficialmente canonizados o beatificados por la iglesia.

Contrariamente a la creencia de una secta cristiana conocida, que: “Sólo ciento cuarenta y cuatro mil personas se salvarán o entran en el Reino de Dios”, nuestra primera lectura de hoy, nos da la esperanza que hay suficientes habitaciones en el Reino de Dios para todo aquel que triunfa. Por lo tanto, todos los Santos se refiere a: “La multitud tan grande que nadie podía contar. Eran individuos de todas las naciones y razas, de todos los pueblos y lenguas.”

Esta lectura muestra dos cosas importantes. La primera es que aparte de los Santos canonizados oficialmente, hay muchos más que han vivido una vida heroica y virtuosa. Son desconocidos por los hombres, pero Dios el creador y padre reconoce su esfuerzo y lucha. Son: “Los que han lavado sus vestiduras en la sangre del cordero,” En segundo lugar, también se muestra que el amor de Dios es para todas las naciones.

Por lo tanto, hoy la segunda lectura nos recuerda, cuánto nos ama Dios. Todos los Santos (parte de la iglesia triunfante), ahora disfrutan de la plenitud de este amor. Nosotros (“La Iglesia militante”), que todavía vive, también disfrutamos el amor de Dios. Es este mismo amor que nos sostiene en nuestro camino diario de viaje. Sin embargo, “ahora somos hijos de Dios, pero no se ha manifestado cómo seremos al fin”. Por supuesto, seremos glorificados también como los Santos que celebramos hoy y compartiremos la plenitud del amor de Dios.

El Evangelio de hoy nos da una perfecta credencial de todos los Santos que honramos hoy. Son los verdaderos dichosos. Cada uno de ellos cae en una o más de estas categorías. Eran pobres de espíritu, sufrieron y lloraron por la salvación de los demás. Tenían hambre y sed de justicia y de verdad. En el proceso fueron muy perseguidos y magullados. A pesar de todo esto, eran puros en su corazón, misericordiosos con todos y trabajaron por la paz.

Mientras que esto coincide con el perfil y la recompensa actual de todos los Santos, también nos dejan con una gran esperanza. Todos los Santos eran seres humanos mortales como cada uno de nosotros. Ellos vinieron, vieron, lucharon y conquistaron. La misma gracia que les ayudó está disponible para nosotros hoy. La buena noticia es que, si soportamos, también nosotros disfrutaremos la misma recompensa.

Las lecciones de la celebración de hoy son grandes. Muchas veces he oído a algunas personas decir cosas como: “Mira, he estado trabajando y haciendo mi mejor esfuerzo, sin embargo, nadie me reconoce. Nadie sabe que existo aquí. Nadie se preocupa por mis esfuerzos. No cuentes ni digas nada a nadie.”

Si realmente entendemos quien es Dios, no pensáramos ni habláramos de esta manera. La verdad es que, los seres humanos no pueden apreciar sus esfuerzos y valor, pero Dios lo aprecia. Esto es porque, Él sabe que estás ahí. Eres importante y significas mucho para. Él te ama, y está esperando pacientemente tu superas este mundo para compartir la plenitud de su amor. Así que, como todos los Santos, estás entre la clase de personas que el Señor está buscando. Por eso, Oremos: ¡Todos los Santos, rueguen por nosotros!

¡La paz sea con ustedes!

¡Maranatha

Thursday, XXX Week of Ordinary Time, Year A

I must continue on my way today

Readings: 1st: Eph 6:10-20; Ps 143; Gos: Lk 13:31-35

This brief reflection was written by Fr. Njoku Canice Chukwuemeka, C.S.Sp. He is a Catholic Priest and a member of the Congregation of the Holy Spirit (Spiritans). He is a missionary in Puerto Rico, the island of enchantment. He is the Chancellor of the Dioceses of Fajardo-Humacao, Puerto Rico; the Parish Priest of Parroquia la Resurrección del Senor, Canóvanas and the Major Superior of the Congregation of the Holy Spirit (Spiritans), Circumscription of Puerto Rico and Dominican Republic. For more details and comments contact him at:  canice_c_njoku@yahoo.com, canicechukwuemeka@gmail.com.

Today, Thursday of the thirtieth week of ordinary time, Luke presents a dialogue between Christ and the Pharisees.

The advice of the Pharisees was a tactical rejection and indirect effort to expulse Christ from their territory. Of course, they were right to say, “Herod wants to kill you.” However, they are part of the plot to kill Jesus.

Christ’s response was very courageous. Of course, he knows the threat against him and his mission. However, he will not allow any such threat to deter him from fulfilling the will of his Father.

Proclaiming the good news comes with risks and does not depend on what pollical leaders say or want. So, we must keep working and trusting in God’s protection while being careful at the same time.

God, the owner of the mission, determines the time and end of our mission. hence Christ insists, “I must continue on my way today, tomorrow, and the following day, for it is impossible that a prophet should die outside of Jerusalem.” He has a duty and knows where it will become to an end.

Christ recalls the treatment his predecessors received from the authorities as a way of reminding them that he knows their plan for him too. He was not afraid to die like his predecessors.

Despite all these threats, Christ was passionate about the salvation of Jerusalem, his homeland. So, we must not be comfortable with the status quo, especially when our people are in danger because of their stubbornness and unbelief.

As ministers and God’s messengers, we must speak out and pray for our country and people’s salvation. Even though his death was imminent, Jesus, because of his great love, continued to care for people who were suffering. To continue to persevere in doing good in the face of great difficulties is a great grace.

So, today let us ask God to always grant us this type of grace of perseverance in his mission, especially during difficult moments, that we may remain courageous and focused on his mission.

Peace be with you

Maranatha!

Jueves, XXX Semana de Tiempo Ordinario, Año A

Debo continuar en mi camino hoy

Lecturas: 1ra: Ef 6, 10-20; Sal: 143; Ev: Lc 13, 31-35

Esta breve reflexión fue escrita por el Padre Canice Chukwuemeka Njoku, C.S.Sp. Es un sacerdote católico y  miembro de la Congregación del Espíritu Santo (Espirítanos). Es un misionero en Puerto Rico, la isla del encanto. Es el Canciller de la Diócesis de Fajardo-Humacao, Puerto Rico; Párroco de la Parroquia la Resurrección del Señor, Canóvanas, y el Superior Mayor la Congregación del Espíritu Santo (Espirítanos), Circunscripción de Puerto Rico y Republica Dominicana. Para más detalles y comentarios se puede contactarlo alcanice_c_njoku@yahoo.com, cancilleriadfh@gmail.com, canicechukwuemeka@gmail.com.

Hoy, jueves de la trigésima semana del tiempo ordinario, Lucas presenta un diálogo entre Cristo y los fariseos.

El Consejo de los fariseos fue un rechazo táctico y un esfuerzo indirecto para expulsar a Cristo de su territorio. Por supuesto, tenían razón al decir, “Herodes quiere matarte”. Sin embargo, son parte del complot para matar a Jesús.

La respuesta de Cristo fue muy valiente. Por supuesto, conoce la amenaza contra él y su misión. Sin embargo, no permitirá que tal amenaza lo impida cumplir la voluntad de su Padre.

Proclamar las buenas noticias conlleva riesgos y no depende de lo que los líderes políticos digan o quieran. Así que, debemos seguir trabajando y confiando en la protección de Dios teniendo cuidado al mismo tiempo.

Dios, el dueño de la misión, determina el tiempo y el fin de nuestra misión. Por lo tanto, Cristo insiste, “hoy, mañana y pasado mañana tengo que seguir mi camino, porque no conviene que un profeta muera fuera de Jerusalén. Cristo tiene un deber y sabe dónde llegará a su fin.

Cristo recuerda el tratamiento que sus predecesores recibieron de las autoridades como una manera de recordarles que él también conoce su plan para él. No tenía miedo de morir como sus predecesores.

A pesar de todas estas amenazas, Cristo fue apasionado por la salvación de Jerusalén, su patria. Por lo tanto, no debemos sentarnos cómodos con el statu quo, especialmente cuando nuestro pueblo está en peligro debido a su obstinación e incredulidad.

Como ministros y mensajeros de Dios, debemos hablar y orar por la salvación de nuestra paria y nuestro pueblo. Aunque su muerte era inminente, Jesús, debido a su gran amor, continuó cuidando de las personas que sufrían. Seguir perseverando en hacer el bien ante las grandes dificultades es una gran gracia.

Así que, hoy pidamos a Dios que nos conceda siempre este tipo de gracia de perseverancia en su misión, especialmente en momentos difíciles, para que podamos seguir siendo valientes y centrados en su misión.

La paz sea con ustedes

¡Maranatha!

Wednesday, XXX Week of Ordinary Time, Year A

Saints Simon and Jude, Pray for Us

Readings: 1st: Eph 2:19-22; Ps 19; Gos: Lk 13:8-21

This brief reflection was written by Fr. Njoku Canice Chukwuemeka, C.S.Sp. He is a Catholic Priest and a member of the Congregation of the Holy Spirit (Spiritans). He is a missionary in Puerto Rico, the island of enchantment. He is the Chancellor of the Dioceses of Fajardo-Humacao, Puerto Rico; the Parish Priest of Parroquia la Resurrección del Senor, Canóvanas and the Major Superior of the Congregation of the Holy Spirit (Spiritans), Circumscription of Puerto Rico and Dominican Republic. For more details and comments contact him at:  canice_c_njoku@yahoo.com, canicechukwuemeka@gmail.com.

Today, the Wednesday of the thirtieth week of ordinary time, the Church honors two great pillars of our faith, Saints Simon and Jude, Apostles.

Apart from being among the early disciples that Christ chose as apostles, much is unknown about their history. However, Jude is known for his epistle in the New Testament.

In today’s gospel, Luke presents us with a very brief narrative of Christ’s calling of the twelve apostles, among whom were, “Simon who was called a Zealot, and Judas the son of James.”

Even though much is unknown about these two glorious apostles’ history, the fact is that first, as faithful servants, they responded fully to Christ’s call by abandoning everything to follow him.

Second, they paid the precious price by preaching the good news in words and deeds and even shed their blood for it.

Though short and a list of the twelve apostles’ names, today’s gospel has a vital lesson for us. This is specifically from Christ’s action before selecting his twelve apostles.

Luke writes, “Jesus went up to the mountain to pray, and he spent the night in prayer to God. When the day came, he called his disciples to himself, and from them, he chose twelve….”

Christ knew he was about to take a serious decision that required divine guidance, so he took nothing for granted. He prayed about it and committed his project into God’s hand.

Hence, Christ teaches us the importance of seeking divine guidance and presenting our plans to God in prayer before embarking on any new project or mission.

So, we must pay heed to this wise saying: “Commit to the Lord whatever you do, and he will establish your plans” (Proverbs 16:3).

If we do, though we encounter some obstacles on the way, the Lord will always come to our aid because our project or mission is his and received his blessing.

Saints Simon and Jude, pray for us

Peace be with you

Maranatha!

Miércoles, XXX Semana de Tiempo Ordinario, Año A

Santos Simón y Judas, oren por nosotros

Lecturas: 1ra: Ef 2:19-22; Sal: 19; Ev: Lc 13:8-21

Esta breve reflexión fue escrita por el Padre Canice Chukwuemeka Njoku, C.S.Sp. Es un sacerdote católico y  miembro de la Congregación del Espíritu Santo (Espirítanos). Es un misionero en Puerto Rico, la isla del encanto. Es el Canciller de la Diócesis de Fajardo-Humacao, Puerto Rico; Párroco de la Parroquia la Resurrección del Señor, Canóvanas, y el Superior Mayor la Congregación del Espíritu Santo (Espirítanos), Circunscripción de Puerto Rico y Republica Dominicana. Para más detalles y comentarios se puede contactarlo alcanice_c_njoku@yahoo.com, cancilleriadfh@gmail.com, canicechukwuemeka@gmail.com.

Hoy, el miércoles de la trigésima semana del tiempo ordinario, la Iglesia honra dos grandes pilares de nuestra fe, los santos Simón y Judas, Apóstoles.

Aparte de estar entre los primeros discípulos que Cristo escogió como apóstoles, mucho se desconoce acerca de su historia. Sin embargo, Judas es conocido por su epístola en el Nuevo Testamento.

En el evangelio de hoy, Lucas nos presenta una narración muy breve del llamamiento de Cristo a los doce apóstoles, entre los cuales estaban: “Simón que fue llamado el fanático, y Judas hijo de Santiago.”

Aunque se desconoce mucho sobre la historia de estos dos apóstoles gloriosos, el hecho es que, en primer lugar, como siervos fieles, respondieron plenamente al llamado de Cristo abandonando todo para seguirlo.

Segundo, pagaron el precio precioso predicando las buenas nuevas en palabras y hechos e incluso derramaron su sangre por la buena nueva.

Aunque es breve y una lista de los nombres de los doce apóstoles, el evangelio de hoy tiene una lección vital para nosotros. Esto es específicamente de la acción de Cristo antes de escoger a sus doce apóstoles.

Lucas escribe, “Jesús subió a la montaña para orar, y pasó la noche en oración a Dios. Cuando llegó el día, llamó a sus discípulos a sí mismo, y de ellos escogió doce…”.

Cristo sabía que estaba a punto de tomar una decisión seria que requería guía divina, así que, no dio nada por sentado. Oró y puso su proyecto en las manos de Dios.

Por lo tanto, Cristo nos enseña la importancia de buscar la guía divina y presentar nuestros planes a Dios en oración antes de embarcarnos en cualquier nuevo proyecto o misión.

Así que, debemos prestar atención a este dicho sabio: “Pon en manos del Señor todos tus planes, y tus proyectos se cumplirán.” (Proverbios 16:3).

Si lo hacemos, aunque encontramos algunos obstáculos en el camino, el Señor siempre vendrá a nuestro auxilio porque nuestro proyecto o misión es suyo y recibió su bendición.

Santos Simón y Judas, oren por nosotros

La paz sea con ustedes

¡Maranatha!

Tuesday, XXX Week of Ordinary Time, Year A

God’s Kingdom is like a Mustard Seed

Readings: 1st: Eph 5:21-33; Ps 127; Gos: Lk 13:8-21

This brief reflection was written by Fr. Njoku Canice Chukwuemeka, C.S.Sp. He is a Catholic Priest and a member of the Congregation of the Holy Spirit (Spiritans). He is a missionary in Puerto Rico, the island of enchantment. He is the Chancellor of the Dioceses of Fajardo-Humacao, Puerto Rico; the Parish Priest of Parroquia la Resurrección del Senor, Canóvanas and the Major Superior of the Congregation of the Holy Spirit (Spiritans), Circumscription of Puerto Rico and Dominican Republic. For more details and comments contact him at:  canice_c_njoku@yahoo.com, canicechukwuemeka@gmail.com.

Today, Tuesday of the thirtieth week of ordinary time, Luke presents us Christ’s parable of the mustard seed and yeast.

This Gospel reading has its parallel in Mt 13:31-35. In life, most things that eventually become great begin like small seeds sown into the earth.

For example, most mega businesses in our world today started in small apartments. Most living organisms begin their life from small seed from semen or pollen.  

In today’s gospel, Christ used the parable of the mustard seed and yeast to illustrate how the word of God develops, and the mystery of the kingdom of God present in our life.

One important point to note in both parables is the measure (size and quantity) of the elements involved. They are both small, but eventually, develop into something great.

At first, they looked insignificant, but after some time, they produced something very significant and great that benefits others.

In both cases, before this significant success of these elements, the seed and the yeast must first undergo transformation by losing their identity. They equally interact with, and transform their environment as they develop.

What do we learn from these two similar parables today? Like both the mustard seed and the yeast, the word of God is the seed of the God’s kingdom that has been sown in our life.

It does not matter how little we have heard it, or at what point in our life we received it. What matters is that, if it finds a fertile place in us, it will transform us into something precious and beautiful.

This kingdom grows in us every day. It grows through the preaching we hear every day, and eventually touches the life of others positively.

It grows through the witness of our Christian family and community, and equally becomes Christ’s good news which radiates light, attracts, and transforms other people around us.

So, the kingdom of God is not something abstract, it is within and around us, and it continues developing every day. It is here now, and equally in the future, because Christ reigns in us and will reign forever. Amen.

Peace be with you

Maranatha!

Martes, XXX Semana de Tiempo Ordinario, Año A

El reino de Dios parece a la semilla de mostaza

Lecturas: 1ra: Ef 5:21-33; Sal: 127; Ev: Lc 13, 18-21

Esta breve reflexión fue escrita por el Padre Canice Chukwuemeka Njoku, C.S.Sp. Es un sacerdote católico y  miembro de la Congregación del Espíritu Santo (Espirítanos). Es un misionero en Puerto Rico, la isla del encanto. Es el Canciller de la Diócesis de Fajardo-Humacao, Puerto Rico; Párroco de la Parroquia la Resurrección del Señor, Canóvanas, y el Superior Mayor la Congregación del Espíritu Santo (Espirítanos), Circunscripción de Puerto Rico y Republica Dominicana. Para más detalles y comentarios se puede contactarlo alcanice_c_njoku@yahoo.com, cancilleriadfh@gmail.com, canicechukwuemeka@gmail.com.

Hoy, martes de la trigésima semana del tiempo ordinario, Lucas nos presenta las parábolas de Cristo de la semilla de mostaza, y la levadura.

Esta lectura del Evangelio tiene su paralelo en Mt 13:31-35. En la vida, la mayoría de las cosas que eventualmente se vuelven grandes comienzan como pequeñas semillas sembradas en la tierra.

Por ejemplo, la mayoría de las mega negocios en nuestro mundo hoy en día comenzaron en pequeños apartamentos. La mayoría de los organismos vivos comienzan su vida de pequeñas semillas de semen o polen.

En el evangelio de hoy, Cristo utilizó la parábola de la semilla de mostaza y la levadura para ilustrar cómo se desarrolla la palabra de Dios, y el misterio del reino de Dios presente en nuestra vida.

Un punto importante a notar en ambas parábolas es la medida de (tamaño y cantidad) de los elementos involucrados. Ambos son pequeños, pero eventualmente, se convierten en algo grande.

Al principio, parecían insignificantes, pero después de algún tiempo, produjeron algo grande y muy significativo que beneficia a otros.

En ambos casos, antes de este éxito significativo de estos elementos, la semilla y la levadura primero deben experimentar la transformación por perder su identidad. Igualmente, transforman su ambiente mientras se desarrollan.

¿Qué aprendemos de estas dos parábolas similares hoy? Como la semilla de mostaza y la levadura, la palabra de Dios es la semilla del reino de Dios que ha sido sembrada en nuestra vida.

No importa lo poco que la hayamos escuchado, o en qué momento de nuestra vida la hayamos recibido. Lo que importa es que, si encuentra un lugar fértil en nosotros, nos transformará en algo precioso y hermoso.

Este reino crece en nosotros cada día. Crece a través de la predicación que escuchamos cada día, y eventualmente toca la vida de los demás positivamente.

Crece a través del testimonio de nuestra familia y comunidad cristiana, y se convierte igualmente en la buena nueva de Cristo, que irradia luz, atrae y transforma a otras personas que nos rodean.

Así que el reino de Dios no es algo abstracto, está dentro y alrededor de nosotros, y sigue desarrollándose cada día. Está aquí ahora, e igualmente en el futuro, porque Cristo reina en nosotros y reinará para siempre. Amen.

La paz sea con ustedes

¡Maranatha!